CHURCH EDIFICE

This link is to an excellent article on the Mary Baker Eddy Library website about the building of this church, titled

Building “Mrs. Eddy’s Gift” to Concord, New Hampshire

https://www.marybakereddylibrary.org/research/building-mrs-eddys-gift-to-concord-new-hampshire/

See more photos of the building of the church in the link above

“Building of the Church”

under the History main heading.

 

 This photo, also included in the above article, was taken on the day of the dedication, July 17, 1904.

Crowd of people in front of 1st Church of CS Concord

Photo courtesy of Longyear Museum, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

“Our proper reason for church edifices is, that in them Christians may worship God, – not that Christians may worship church edifices!”

This is quoted from the Address by Mary Baker Eddy at the Dedication of this church on Sunday, July 17, 1904.  The First Church of Christ, Scientist and Miscellany, p. 162                                   
                          

Mary Baker Eddy came often to see the progress of the building of the church, and was often consulted by the supervising architect.

Architects and Contractor

 The architects were Francis Richmond Allen and Charles Collens of Boston.

ALLEN, FRANCIS RICHMOND 
A.I.A. He studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, and later received an LL.D. from Amherst and an honorary M.A. from Williams. His firm of Allen & Collens designed eight buildings at Williams College, twelve at Vassar, Union Theological Seminary’s group in New York, and that of Andover Theological Seminary in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was a member of the American Institute of Architects, Boston Society of Colonial Wars, and Society of Mayflower Descendants.                     –from The Society of Architectural Historians                                                                                               

The contractor was E. Noyes Whitcomb of Boston, the father of Miss Ethel Whitcomb, former Second Reader of The Mother Church and later a member of the Board of Lectureship.  E. Noyes Whitcomb was the contractor for the original Mother Church in 1894.  He was also the contractor for the State House in Boston and the Gale Memorial Library in Laconia, among many other libraries and buildings in New England.

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Mrs. Eddy Pays First Visit to New Church in Concord.

[reprinted here from the 1904 Christian Science Sentinel, Vol. VIII, No. 4, p. 54.  The original is from The Concord (N.H.) Daily Patriot by KG.   Irving C. Tomlinson accompanied Mrs. Eddy during this visit and is said to be responsible for these details described.]

Mr. Editor: 

“Yesterday, for the first time, the Rev. Mary Baker G. Eddy visited the new Christian Science church in this city, her munificent gift to the local congregation of that faith.

“Mrs. Eddy entered the church by the southeast door [correction: southwest*], which admitted her to the room prepared for her use in the edifice, which the Scientists call “Our Leader’s room,” and those who planned this pretty apartment should know the pleasure it gave her.  Her artistic sense took in at a glance the beautiful circles of light falling in pendants like grape clusters [reference to the ‘electolier’ floor lamp], the delicate pale green upholstery, embroidered silk drapery, the highly polished Indiana oak floor, and the lighting, done by means of numerous incandescent bulbs deftly hidden in the corniced moulding of the room; also the beautiful bound copies of the Bible and her own published works, and other dainty, costly gifts from members of her church.  

“After spending some time here, Mrs. Eddy visited the public Reading Room, which is kept open every week-day from 2 to 5 P.M.  Thence she entered the church proper, and after a general survey took a seat in one of the carved upholstered pews, to view deliberately the magnificent transept windows, the grand gift of First Church of Christ, Scientist, of New York City, placed in position last week.  Mrs. Eddy regards these windows as exceptional specimens of the highest art; they were described in your columns last Saturday. [Christian Science Journal, Vol. 23, p. 435-6; see the Windows section of this website]  The organ engaged her attention, and called forth encomiums [a formal expression of high praise]; the graceful lines of the massive roof-timbers, the fine natural finish of the Indiana oak comprising the entire woodwork, the interlocking noiseless rubber floor tiling, the harmony of coloring and arrangement of the entire auditorium, were all noted and favorably commented upon with much joy.”      

                                                     K. G.   The Concord (N. H.) Daily Patriot 

* “Our Leader’s Room” was built especially for Mrs. Eddy’s use with an entrance from outside directly into the room at the southwest corner of the edifice.

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There are three platform chairs because there were three in Christian Science Hall, the original church building on the same site.  

The center chair was probably intended for Mrs. Eddy, although she did not attend any church services.

  

 

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Foyer

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For further information on the many interesting details within the Church edifice, see these Links above, or here —

Music       Pews       Quotations     Windows 

 Board Room       Our Leader’s Room

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